Guitar Effect Test Box

I’m in various stages of completion for several guitar effects at the moment and I’ll certainly try to write a post for each of those in turn. However, I first figured I should post about my guitar effect PCB test box I put together. I by no means first came up with the idea. Paul of DIY Guitar Pedals in Australia is who I first saw use & recommend one. In searching around for further ideas, I came across some notes on DIY Stomp Boxes about adding the probe, which can be used in diagnosing PCBs that aren’t working.

A MXR MicroAmp circuit hooked up to the test box

As you can see, I went with a fairly large enclosure for this project. As it’s really just the off-board wiring standard to most any pedal project, with no circuit board, this is somewhat a waste of space. However, I wanted to leave a bit of space for potentially adding some more features at some point in the future1. This is a powder-coated, aluminum enclosure which is not at all necessary for this, as the wiring is outside so the metal box isn’t shielding anything. So the enclosure was a bit of a splurge. But as Mammoth currently sells these 1590BB enclosures powder coated for under $10, it’s not exactly a bank-buster. The entire test box is less than $25, and many of the parts I already had in my parts bin.

I cut up some cheap alligator clips I bought off of Amazon.com to use for the connectors. They have little covers over the clips, so they work quite well even when connecting into closely spaced wiring leads. I did knot these just inside the box to provide some strain relief (though it’s not as though this thing is getting roughed up much). I used a Mammoth Electronics bypass wiring board just to simplify things a bit. I tend to use a standard wiring colors for all my projects: red for 9v, black for ground, green for signal to board, and yellow for signal back from board.

The spacious guts of my test box

The one trick my box has is that I added a toggle switch to use a testing probe. This switch basically hi-jacks the signal return (yellow) and connects the probe (white) directly to the box output jack. So if signal isn’t coming back from the circuit, I can flip this switch and then use the probe (which is nothing more than a 1μf capacitor) to touch along the circuit to trace where the fault is. It’s very simple but incredibly helpful.

So to quote Paul of DY Guitar Effects, if you’re going to even build just more than a couple of guitar effects yourself, you’re going to want to build something like this. It’s so invaluable to be able to test your PCB as soon as you get the components installed but before you try to complete all the off board wiring & stuffing it into an enclosure. It’s also extremely fun to hook up to a breadboard and test that way!

A Bazz Fuzz breadboard circuit on the test box
My enclosure drill pattern
Wiring diagram for my test box


  1. For example, I also saw this post where someone has added in the ability to change the voltage and add a voltage sag (to simulate a dying battery), which is really cool.