Amp Channel Footswitch

Most amps have the ability to use an external footswitch to change between a clean and distortion channel. Of course, some have more sophisticated options than this, but the channel switch is a pretty common feature. My older brother recently got an awesome-looking, orange Fender Duo-Sonic and a small Fender practice amp to play it through. This little Mustang amp has a lot of presets and he can use a footswitch to select between a pair of them. Of course, it being an affordable practice amp, the footswitch is sold separately.

But a footswitch is a pretty easy thing to make yourself. In my case, I had the double pole single throw (DPST) footswitch taken out of my Dunlop Wah pedal when I modded it (post to come someday!) and an old stereo audio jack. That, a bit of wire, and something to put it in is all you need! In fact, the fact that it was a double pole switch and a stereo jack made them both overkill for this small project! But why not recycle the parts for a good cause?

I purchased a powder-coated 1590LB enclosure from Mammoth Electronics. At 2″ by 2″ by 1″ tall, this is about as small an enclosure as you can get, but plenty big for a small switch and a jack. I got the orange to match his guitar (well, as close as I can get with stock powder coat colors, anyway). I laid out the switch and jack to ensure I could arrange them how I wanted; though I could have also just had the jack on the “side” of the enclosure. The circuit soldering here is super-simple: just solder the “tip” lug of the jack to the center lug of one of the poles (three of the lugs in a line make a pole). Then solder the “sleeve” lug of the jack to either the left or right lug on the same poll of the switch. That’s it! Did you mess up and wire the sleeve to the center lug on the switch? It’s still fine! All this does is connect the tip to the sleeve when the switch is “on” and then breaks the circuit between the two when it’s off.

Now, this particular build relies on an instrument cable to connect the footswitch to your amp. But you don’t have to use a shielded cable for this as the guitar signal itself isn’t passing through that cable; just a relatively low voltage (around 4-5v1) is flowing through to tell the amp the gain channel should be on. So you could actually skip the jack and just use any old wire (speaker cable, a lamp cord, etc.) and wire that into a 1/4″ audio cable end. I was just using as many spare parts as I could. In fact, I finished the bottom by cutting up a kitchen jar grip pad and gluing it to the bottom with spray adhesive (it won’t slide on his hardwood floor!).

Given that the Fender single footswitch costs around $15, this probably is not much of a cheaper alternative. But it was a fun gift for my brother and if you’re interested in practicing some soldering, this is a great and practical project to start with!

So, amazingly enough, there’s a video in which YouTube channel MerwinMusic makes the exact same footswitch as mine – down to the orange color! Check it out! He also does a great job of explaining how to test out that this sort of switch works with your amp before you go to the trouble of building one, which is a good idea as some amps may vary (but all good amps just copy Leo’s original!).

I built this exact same project almost!
  1. The voltage is low enough that my Blackstar head’s footswitch doesn’t even have a resistor on the LED.

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