The Real Glass Menagerie

Angela and I were able to go see a local production of Tennessee Williams’ “The Glass Menagerie” Saturday night. The cast and production were excellent and the audience, ourselves included, were moved by Laura’s panic attack as Jim arrives and with Tom’s final address of the audience.:

Perhaps I am walking along a street at night, in some strange city, before I have found companions. I pass the lighted window of a shop where perfume is sold. The window is filled with pieces of coloured glass, tiny transparent bottles in delicate colours, like bits of a shattered rainbow.

Then all at once my sister touches my shoulder. I turn around and look into her eyes…

Oh, Laura, Laura, I tried to leave you behind me, but I am more faithful than I intended to be!

I had recalled from high school that this play was largely autobiographical, but reading more about Williams’ life makes that scene all the more heartbreaking. One of Williams’ two sisters, Rose, was Tennessee’s (real name: Thomas) closest friend when growing up was the basis for the character of Laura, or “Blue Roses” as she is nicknamed in the play. Rose Williams was given a lobotomy —one with some apparently very bad effect on her personality— after he left home to pursue his career in writing. He later would move her to a closer facility and, upon his death, leave much of his wealth to provide for her.

“The Glass Menagerie” was a ground-breaking play in how it dealt with personality disorders, inter-family dynamics, and the cost of leaving home for one’s own sake. It’s no wonder it still has so much power knowing what Williams went through for the source.

Schneider on the FBI Demand on Apple

When Bruce Schneier weighs in on the security implications of government actions, we should all pay attention:

We cannot build a backdoor that only works for a particular type of government, or only in the presence of a particular court order.

This is the person that coined the phrase “security theater” and he isn’t in the habit of making up unlikely stories to scare us. He is, however, very good at understanding real risks to security for people, businesses, and countries.

Coke Life

I happened to see a six pack of Coca-Cola Life1 at the grocery store the other day. I don’t recall ever even hearing about the beverage before, but it’s sort of a ‘natural’2 version of the discontinued C2, which was a half-calorie soda. Life uses both cane sugar and Stevia as sweeteners.

I personally liked the flavor of C2 and I like Life. It seems to use the original Coke formula, similar to Coke Zero — as opposed to the New Coke formula, which of course we are most familiar with in Diet Coke. It’s definitely not the same as a ‘regular’ Coke, or even a ‘Mexican’ Coke (that is, a cane-sugar Coke) but I find Stevia to be one of the most acceptable sugar-free sweeteners. At 60 calories (per 8oz), it’s meant to be a light alternative to a ‘regular’ Coke and appeal to people who might purchase Mexican Coke.

I think Life is a bit hard to find, so far. Further, it’s in an 8oz glass bottle, so it’s sold at a premium over it’s more common siblings. And in case you were wondering, it is a caffeinated drink (thankfully).

Coke Life

Coca-Cola Life

On a related note, starting a year ago, I simply stopped buying sodas to have a home except on occasion (like when I see an entirely new drink on the shelf!). However, when we do bring them home, we have shifted to the smaller 7.5oz/222ml cans, which ends up being a nice amount to have with a lunch. Those are 100 calories for a ‘regular’ Coke, so I’d probably have to drink a lot more sodas than I am now in order to justify hunting down & paying more per drink for Coke Life.

  1. I couldn’t find any reviews on Bev Reviews about this drink, but a post from a year ago indicates it was first released in 2013 in Argentina.
  2. In as much as a soda can ever be natural.

Signed Scotty Card

When I Met Scotty

The Time I Met Scotty

Over Memorial Day weekend in 1999, Angela, her cousin, Jonathan, and I went to the Star Trek Convention at the Cumberland Science Museum to see James Doohan, who played engineer Montgomery Scott on Star Trek. Jonathan brought along cards for us all to get signed. Almost 15 years later, I managed to find mine.

Star Ratings

After doing the Jawgrind podcast with some friends for the past couple of years, I’ve realized just how much a five star rating system can vary among different people — and even myself at different times. As I’ve been rating entertainment (and even goods, as in the case of Amazon) for years, I’ve always had something of a descriptions for setting star ratings. I think it might be worth putting those down, for my own sake, as well as anyone who might be interested in reading them.

  • ★★★★★ – This is a work I feel I could watch, read, or listen to at any almost any time. It holds cultural significance (to me) and I feel may help you to better understand me as a person1.
  • ★★★★☆ – This was an excellent piece of work. Though it might have had some flaws, I would enjoy revisiting it again in the future. I would recommend this to most anyone, particularly if this seems in line with their interest.
  • ★★★☆☆ – This as a solid piece. I would recommend it with some reservations, but I might not have much cause to revisit in the future.
  • ★★☆☆☆ – This piece suffered from severe flaws. Though I may have enjoyed parts of it, I almost certainly wouldn’t recommend it to anyone nor would I want to revisit it.
  • ★☆☆☆☆ – This piece had very few, if any, redeeming qualities. I may not have even finished it2. I would actively encourage others to avoid this. Knowing that someone did enjoy it might make me question their taste or, at least, question if I really understand them.

So, if you search for about a minute, you’d surely find something I’ve rated that doesn’t seen to fit into this scale. I don’t claim to apply any rigor to this at all (as I indicated by the need to document them here).

Jawgrind ratings, for example, are done in the vacuum that is Star Trek: The Original Series (for me, at least; I can’t speak for others on the show). I’m not saying a five-star rating I gave to an episode of that show would compare to a five-star rating of a novel, film, or album3. Those episodes are rating on a microcosm version of this scale, and should only be compared to themselves. Had I tried to use this universal scale on those episodes, I wouldn’t have had the granularity to usefully describe each one 4.

I do try to apply this scale to books on Goodreads, films or shows on Netflix, or albums in iTunes5. In the case of Netflix or iTunes (and Amazon, even), this has a positive feedback of helping recommendations (though Netflix seems to have given up actually trying to recommend anything despite that whole million-dollar prize thing). Even there, I’m sure I’m not as consistent as I’d like to be.

  1. I cannot, though, say I universally recommend my five star ratings, though. Why? Because something so well loved by someone may require some very specific tastes. That level of enjoyment isn’t necessarily going to be felt by all, but this is why I indicate you might understand me better as a result.
  2. Though, out of fairness, I try to never rate something I didn’t complete (or, in the case of foods, at least thoroughly try). I don’t see how someone can give a valuable rating to something they never finished watching or reading, for example.
  3. However, I’ve considered that a overall series rating (or at least by season) would would be useful in this scale, though.
  4. They’d pretty much all be 2 or 3, to be frankly honest about it.
  5. If you didn’t already know this, you can rate entire albums independently of songs in iTunes, which can be very helpful in constructing genre favorite playlists (genre + album with 3+ rating).

India Declared Polio-free

After three years without a single reported case of polio, India was declared free of polio. It’s been so long since polio was a epidemic in the United States &emdash;which goes a long to way to explaining our current anti-vaccination and anti-science culture&emdash; that is hard to grasp how monumental this news is for so many people. The BBC reports that there are only three countries left where polio is endemic: Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria. Wired recently had an excellent long-form piece on the effort to eradicate polio from the planet.